I try to make a point of going through my closet and dresser – item by item – at least once a year, and ruthlessly getting rid of anything that I don’t wear, doesn’t fit, or is out of style. Lately, I’ve realized that I need to buy a few new things for spring and summer – some new work clothes, bathing suits for a beach vacation in June, etc. But, I made a rule that I wasn’t allowed to buy a single new article of clothing until I completed my closet purging project.

Unfortunately, I started the process a couple times and just couldn’t get myself going. Then, I ran the Atlanta Women’s 5k last weekend with my friend Vanessa, and she had on the coolest, bright yellow Adidas running shoes. Click here to see what they look like. I decided that I absolutely had to have them in pink (see here). And suddenly I had new found motivation for completing my closet cleanse.

For a while, I had been toying with the idea of buying a second pair of running shoes – something a little lighter, faster – to complement the Mizuno Wave Inspires I’ve worn (probably going on six or seven pairs now) for the past couple years. I read Christopher McDougall’s Born to Run a few months ago, and was intrigued by the theories/stories/research he presented on minimalist running. And while I’m not planning on buying a pair of the Vibram Five Fingers anytime soon, I did try on a pair once, just to see how funny they look. Check out my frog foot:

I’ve found the trend toward lighter, less cushioned running shoes very interesting. And I thought a lot of what I read in Born to Run made a lot of sense, that overly cushioned, structured shoes – designed, in theory, to prevent injury – don’t do anything to strengthen your feet because they essentially allow your feet to be lazy, therefore leaving you more prone to injury. As someone who has had a few foot injuries, I’m definitely interested in making them a little stronger.

But all of that science aside, really, I just wanted a new, cool pair of shoes! And I had been reading a lot about “performance trainers” – shoes that you can train in, but that are really designed for shorter, faster/tempo runs and racing. So, I set off for Big Peach – my go-to running store in Brookhaven – on a mission to get my hot pink shoes.

Well, darn Big Peach and their awesome expertise!!  I came in and told Laura, the salesperson helping me, what shoe I wanted. She took one glance at my feet, saw my Mizunos (which I got fitted for at Big Peach), and said, “But the Adidas shoe you’re interested in is a neutral shoe. You’re wearing a stability shoe that helps with overpronation. Why don’t you hop up there on the treadmill, I’ll put you in a neutral shoe, and we can analyze your gait to see if you’re still overpronating.”

Sure enough I was. So Laura wouldn’t let me get the pink shoes. But she did pull out a whole bunch of other performance trainers for me to try – some that I liked, and some that I didn’t. But the ones that I loved were yet another pair of Mizunos – the Wave Elixir model.

And while not hot pink, they are charcoal and silver and pretty bad-ass. And I’ve gone out on a couple shorter runs with them, and holy cow, do I feel fast! I’m very excited to wear them in my next race.

Miles run since last post: 13 ; total miles for the year: 148.2.

 

2 Responses to Spring cleaning equals spring shopping!

  1. Grandmom says:

    The frog foot – no way! Glad you settled on the charcoal and silver. You have to wear the one best for your feet. We don’t want or need any more foot problems. Good luck with the new running shoes. Sounds like you love them already. Love you!

  2. John Pitchford says:

    Hi Honey! It’s funny, when I ran cross country in HS way back when, our shoes were these primitive canvas running shoes with no heel or cushion. They were like track spikes without the spikes, kind of like Earth Shoes. I never heard of anyone having foot injuries. Dad

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